© 2016

Delicious Taste’s (Grant Levy-Lucero and Bruce Yonemoto, Los Angeles) large-scale installations 1968 (on view at UC Santa Barbara) and 1984 (SF Camerawork) — which consists of interwoven discarded computer cords, digital equipment and cameras—references George Orwell’s dystopian novel 1984 as well as the civil unrest and worldwide political protests of 1968. The works reimagine Quipus—early haptic “computers” from the Incan empire of Peru, which used corded knots 4,000 years ago as a way to transmit information (on social life, ideas, trade) to succeeding generations.

1968, 2016, mixed media installation (cords, phones), approx. 9 ft X 15ft

Grant Levy-Doolittle is an American-born knitwear designer, and owner of the Grant Knits studio. In his practice, a use of traditional craft (from hand knitting and crochet to machine knitting, weaving, embroidery, as well as macramé) allows the work to maintain a personal and familiar nostalgia: pushing an audience to confront new and unexpected perspectives on the use of the craft. Through his studio he has collaborated with contemporary artists and fashion designers including Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte, the fashion brand 69, Pari Desai, Michael Dopp, Calvin Marcus, Shirley Kurata and Awol Erizku. His collaboration with Bruce Yonemoto is a continuation of experimentations in craft and materials, but with the conceptual underpinnings Yonemoto is best known for. During his 10 year career as a designer, Levy-Doolittle's work has been featured during multiple Paris Fashion Weeks, New York Fashion Weeks, as well as numerous publications including: Womens Wear Daily, Elle, Vogue, and LA Canvas. His works have been exhibited at Night Gallery and 356 Mission Rd.

Bruce Yonemoto's (b. 1949 San Jose) body of work reflects an ongoing meditation on the personal and cultural mediation of reality and fantasy, identity and representation, truth and simulation. He has collaborated with contemporary artists, including Mike Kelley, Spalding Gray, and Mary Woronov, to create works that capture the essence of their work. This collaboration with Grant Levy-Doolittle (as collaborative team Delicious Taste) is a continuation of that practice. During a twenty-year collaboration with his brother, Norman Yonemoto (1946-2014), they were honored with numerous awards and grants from: the National Endowment for the Arts, the American Film Institute, The Rockefeller Foundation, and the Maya Deren Award for Experimental Film and Video. Most recently, Yonemoto’s solo installations, photographs and sculptures have been featured in major one person exhibitions at the ICC in Tokyo, the ICA in Philadelphia, and the Kemper Museum in Kansas City. He has had solo exhibitions at Blum & Poe and Lemon Sky, Los Angeles, Alexander Gray Gallery, New York, and Tomio Koyama, Tokyo. His work was featured in Los Angeles 1955-85 at the Pompidou Center, Paris, the Generali Foundation, Vienna and at the Gwangju Biennial, South Korea. Bruce Yonemoto is a Professor of Art at the University of California, Irvine.

1968, detail, 2016, mixed media large-scale installation (cords, phones), approx. 3 ft X 15ft
1968, detail, 2016, mixed media large-scale installation (cords, phones), approx. 3 ft X 15ft
2001, 2016, mixed media large-scale installation (cords, fluorescent lights), approx. 3 ft X 12ft
2001, detail, 2016, , mixed media large-scale installation (cords, fluorescent lights), approx. 3 ft X 12ft
2001, 2016 and 1984, 2016
1984, 2016, mixed media large-scale installation (cords, cameras, monitors), approx. 15ft X 7ft.
1984, detail, 2016, mixed media large-scale installation (cords, cameras, monitors), approx. 15ft X 7ft.